Hill Lists

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Now in its 10th year, this popular application includes data for over 7500 hills in the UK and Ireland, plus over 60 lists including …

Munros and Munro Tops, Corbetts, Grahams, Donalds, Furths, Marilyns, Wainwrights and Outlying Fells, Birketts, all County Tops and many more.

For support, please (please, PLEASE …) DON’T USE iTUNES as reviews are left anonymously and I have no way of contacting you if I have questions. Start off with my support page, where known issues and any workarounds are posted as soon as I find out about them. Or contact me directly and you will get a very quick response!

Note that the screen shots shown below are from an iPhone X, however other iPhones and the iPad equivalents look very similar.

Getting Started


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The five icons at the bottom of the screen cover the main ways to interact with the app. From left to right …

  • The lists view shows all the pre-defined lists in the app, and lets you choose the ones you want to track (e.g. Munros, Corbetts, Wainwrights … etc).
  • The calendar view shows all ascents recorded in the app. You can also browse all hills by name, distance from your default location, section, height … etc.
  • The dashboard view shows bar charts of ascents by month and by year, and lists your most frequently climbed hills.
  • The location view shows a map of the nearest 1000 hills from your default location. This defaults to Fort William, but you can change it using the Location button at the top right.
  • The settings view (gear icon) lets you configure the app, and back up your data.

The following sections describe these in more detail.

Lists View


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By default, five commonly used lists are selected for you: the Munros, the Wainwrights, the Trail 100, and both the Welsh and Irish Furths.

To add, remove or re-order the lists you want to track, select the Edit button. Note that some lists are included multiple times, e.g. you might want to track the Marilyns in Scotland, Wales, England and Ireland separately.

Totals are shown for each list, e.g. “123/214 (57%)” means you have climbed 123 out of 214 hills (Wainwrights in this case).

The Map button at the top right shows a map of all unclimbed hills in the lists you are tracking, or all unclimbed hills in multiple of your lists (some hills are in more than one list).

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Select a list to show individual hills. Use the menu icon (top left) to filter just those climbed or those left to do. You can sort the list by section/book number, or by name, height, distance from your default location, date climbed or ascents. Also export the selected hills in CSV format, for easy import into a spreadsheet or to hill-bagging.co.uk.

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The Map button at the top right shows a map of the (possibly filtered) list itself. Climbed hills are shown in green, and other hills are shown in red. Tapping each pin lets you name and view each hill.

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When on an individual hill, you can add an ascent using the + button (at the bottom), setting the date climbed and adding any notes. To delete an ascent, simply swipe across the date row.

The Map button at the top right shows the hill on a map (shown in purple), together with surrounding hills, hills in the same “section” or hills in all sections (i.e. the list itself).

The other icons at the bottom quickly return you to the main (home) screen, link to weather and route and information (for selected hills only), and share you location by email or SMS/text (this assumes you are on top the selected hill).

Ascents and Hills View


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Here you can view all ascents in the app, sorted by date climbed (most recent first). Using the control at the top of the screen, you can also browse all hills in the app (sorted by name) or all nearby hills (sorted by distance from your default location). Use the menu icon (top left) to change the default filter and sorting options (e.g. by section or height).

Also use the menu icon to export the selected hills in CSV format, for easy import into a spreadsheet or to hill-bagging.co.uk.

The Map button at the top right shows a map of all unclimbed hills nearby. Panning the map updates the hills shown.

Selecting a hill takes you to the same individual hill view as described above.

Dashboard View


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The statistics dashboard shows a bar chart of ascents broken down by month (as a percentage) or years (counts). If you have more than 12 years of recorded ascents, the Max option at the top will show all years.

If you have recorded multiple ascents of any given hill, the most frequently climbed hills are shown (in descending order, most popular first).

Location View


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The location view shows a map of the nearest 1000 hills from your default location. Panning the map updates the hills shown.

Use the Location button (top right) to set your default location. You can either search for a place (by name or postcode) or simply use the centre of the map.

If you agree to the disclaimer in the settings (see below) you can get the device to locate itself (by double tapping the Location button). While locating, the current accuracy is shown, together with the nearest hill, distance and summit feature (useful if the cloud is down!). When it is good enough, select Save.

Settings View


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Use the gear icon and choose Settings (at the top) to configure various application settings.

Three colour themes are supported, the default or classic white and blue (from iOS 7), a darker (blue) and night mode.

Under default contacts, you can set an email address for exporting backups and CSV files (usually your own), and an email address and phone number for sharing your location information (typically a partners).

Also set preferences for distance (miles or kilometres), height (feet or metres), maps (Apple or Google) and sorting lists (manually, by name or by decreasing percentage complete). I recommend using Google maps as it supports terrain view, great for hills and contours!

If you want to track second or third rounds of hills, enabling multiple rounds will reset the climbed count to start again (your ascents are maintained). The current round will be included in brackets, e.g. “Munros (2)” means you are on round 2.

Finally the app can use your device’s location. Once you agree to the disclaimer (that it is not to be relied on for navigation purposes!), the maps will show your current location and the device can locate itself (when setting your default location).

Backups


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Use the gear icon and choose Backups (at the top) to make and/or restore backups of your data.

The backups feature is basically a more reliable way of protecting your data than using iTunes itself. Should the worst happen, it is very easy to import and restore (a backup).

To make a new (manual) backup, select the + button (top right) and an entry will be added to the list of files displayed. Backups are shown in reverse date order (most recent first), and the date and time they were made is included in their names …

hlYYYYMMDD@HHMMSS.bak

To delete a backup, swipe across it from right to left and select Delete.

Exporting Backups

A backup on a single device won’t protect you fully, e.g. you might lose your device or need to restore it to factory settings (e.g. if there is a hardware fault). Also if you delete the app (possibly by accident), all of your backup files will be deleted too. It is therefore very important to export your backups off your device.

On the settings screen, you can choose to have new manual backups copied to either Dropbox or iCloud. Turn this on and all new backups are exported automatically.

If a backup file is on your device, you can select and export it by AirDrop (to a nearby device) or by Email.

Any backups shown in red are probably not on Dropbox/iCloud. To manually copy a backup, select it and choose the Copy option.

By far the easiest way of exporting is to use automatic backups (on the settings screen). Your ascents are monitored and if there are changes, a new backup is made and copied to iCloud when you close the app. Note that the automatic backups feature also removes older backups, only keeping the 5 most recent.

Importing/Restoring Backups

If the file is already there in the app, go to the backups screen, select it and choose the Restore option.

If it is only on Dropbox or iCloud, choose the same backup setting (i.e. Dropbox or iCloud), go to the backups screen and the file should be visible. Select the backup to restore it.

CSV Import


If you have logged ascents on the Hill Bagging site or elsewhere, you can now import these directly into the app using a file in CSV format (comma separated values). Note that I recommend making a backup (see above) BEFORE making any major changes to your database!

To create a CSV file from Hill Bagging, log in and go to the My Logs page (top left). From there you can generate a file of your (selected) ascents.

Alternatively, create your own CSV file (in plain text format), with one ascent per row, each with three columns: the DoBIH hill identifier, a date in yyyy-MM-dd or dd/MM/yyyy format (or leave blank), and any notes/log (again you can leave this blank). An example row might be …

278,2014-08-27,First time up the UK’s highest mountain, via the CMD arete!

An unknown ascent of Ben Nevis with no log would be …

278,,

Once you have a CSV file in the right format, get the file onto your device (see examples below) then select it and choose Copy to Hill Lists. My app will launch and you will be prompted to import the file.

If you email the file to yourself, use your email application (on your iPhone or iPad), find the attachment, select it and choose Copy to Hill Lists.

If using the Dropbox app, find and select the file, choose the elipses (…), then Export, then Open In …, then Copy to Hill Lists.

Other apps should support a similar export/open in/copy option.

Data, Route and Weather Information


The data for the UK and Ireland has been extracted from version 16.0 of the Database of British and Irish Hills, with kind permission from Chris Crocker and Alan Dawson. I would also like to thank Simon Stewart from MountainViews for supporting a merge of their database into the DoBIH – this makes it so much easier behind the scenes!

Route information for the Munros, Corbetts, Grahams, Wainwrights, Hewitts and most of the Trail 100 is provided via external links to the Walk Highlands website.

Route information for most of the hills in Ireland is provided via external links to the MountainViews website.

Weather information for Scotland, the Lake District, the Peak District/Yorkshire Dales and Snowdonia is provided by the MWIS website.

Many thanks to Chris and Alan for making the application more useful than it would have been without their permission(!). Also to Paul Webster for providing links to the Walk Highlands website, to Simon Stewart for providing links to the MountainViews website, to Geoff Monk for help with integrating MWIS, to Mark Brennan for providing useful feedback on Ireland, and to Simon Edwardes for help on the Hill Bagging import format.

Section Numbers, Regions and Areas


The Database of British and Irish Hills divides the hills into sections, initially starting off with the original 17 sections in the Munro list, and extending this up to section 28 to cover the rest of Scotland. Section 29 is the Isle of Man, sections 30-32 are Wales, sections 33-42 are England, sections 43-56 are Ireland and section 57 is the Channel Islands.

By default, the lists are all arranged by section number, except the Wainwrights which are arranged by book (1-7).

Lists


The following sections describe each of the lists (in alphabetical order).

Archies

Scottish hills at least 1000 metres high with a drop of at least 100 metres on all sides. The Archies are a subset of the Scottish HuMPs, as published in The Archies: Scotland’s 1000 metre mountains by Paul Fettes (2017). The ARCHIE Mountain Challenge in aid of the ARCHIE Foundation took place over 16 days in 2015.

Arderins

Hills in Ireland at least 500 metres high with a drop of at least 30m on all sides. The list was compiled in 2002 by Simon Stewart in MountainViews and named in 2009.

Binnions

Hills in Ireland under 400m metres high with a drop of at least 100 metres on all sides.

Birketts

Lake District hills over 1,000ft listed in Bill Birkett’s Complete Lakeland Fells.

Bridges

Hills in England, Wales and the Isle of Man at least 2000 feet high as published in The Mountains of England and Wales by George Bridge (1973).

Buxton and Lewis

Hills in England, Wales and the Isle of Man at least 2000 feet high as published in Mountain Summits of England and Wales by Chris Buxton and Gwyn Lewis (1986).

Carns

Hills in Ireland between 400 and 499.9m high with a drop of at least 30m on all sides as defined by MountainViews.

Corbetts and Corbett Tops

Scottish hills between 2500 and 2999 feet high with a drop of at least 500 feet (152.4m) on all sides.

Tops are subsidiary summits of Munros and Corbetts between 2500 and 2999 feet high with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides.

County Tops

The highest point within (or sometimes on) the boundary of each county.

County boundaries change over time. There are three different county tops lists, covering the traditional historic counties (suffixed H), the more recent mixtures of administrative areas (A) and the current county and unitary authority tops (C).

Deweys, Donald Deweys, Highland Fives and Myrddyn Deweys

Hills in England, Wales and the Isle of Man at least 500m high and below 609.6m with a drop of at least 30m on all sides. Equivalent lists in other geographical areas are the Donald Deweys in the Scottish Lowlands, the Highland Fives in the Scottish Highlands, and the Myrddyn Deweys in Ireland.

Dillons

Hills in Ireland at least 2000 feet high as published in The Mountains of Ireland by Paddy Dillon (2013).

Dodds

Hills in Scotland, England and Wales between 500 and 599.9m high with a drop of at least 30m on all sides.

Donalds, Donald Tops and New Donalds

Hills in the Scottish Lowlands at least 2000 feet high.

Tops are all elevations with a drop of at least 100 feet (30.48m) on all sides and elevations of sufficient topographical merit with a drop of between 50 and 100 feet.

A related list is Dawson’s New Donalds, in which the qualifying criterion is simplified to 30 metres of drop. The New Donalds are a subset of the Donalds and Donald Tops.

Fellrangers

Lake District hills in a set of eight volumes authored by Mark Richards and inspired by the Wainwright guides.

Furths

Hills in England, Wales and Ireland over 3000ft.

Grahams and Graham Tops

Scottish hills between 2000 and 2499 feet high with a drop of at least 150 metres on all sides.

Tops are subsidiary summits of Munros, Corbetts and Grahams between 2000 and 2499 feet high with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides.

Hewitts

Hills in England, Wales and Ireland at least 2000 feet high with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides.

HuMPs

British and Irish hills of any height with a drop of at least 100 metres or more on all sides. The name HuMP stands for Hundred Metre Prominence.

London Boroughs

London Borough tops.

Marilyns

British and Irish hills of any height with a drop of at least 150 metres on all sides. The geographical area includes the Isle of Man and the islands of St Kilda.

Munros and Munro Tops

Scottish hills at least 3000 feet in height regarded by the SMC as distinct and separate mountains, based on Sir Hugh Munro’s list originally published in 1891.

Subsidiary summits meeting the height criterion are designated Munro Tops.

Murdos

Scottish hills at least 3000 feet in height with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides. All Murdos are also Munro Tops but some Munro Tops fail to qualify as Murdos.

Nuttalls

Hills in England and Wales at least 2000 feet high with a drop of at least 15 metres on all sides, as published in The Mountains of England and Wales. The list includes 127 summits that do not qualify as Hewitts.

Simms

Hills at least 600m high with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides.

Synges

Hills in the book The Lakeland Summits: Survey of the Fells of the Lake District National Park by Timothy Synge (1995).

TGO 40s

A list of Britain’s 40 “finest” hills, plus a further 10 in Ireland, as published by The Great Outdoors Magazine (2018).

Trail 100s

A list of 100 hills published in Trail Magazine (2007) which has become popularised by becoming the objective of the WaterAid Trail 100 charity challenge.

Vandeleur-Lynams

Hills in Ireland at least 600 metres high with a drop of at least 15 metres on all sides.

Wainwrights and Outlying Fells

Wainwrights are the 214 hills listed in books 1-7 of Wainwright’s A Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells.

The Outlying Fells are those hills listed in The Outlying Fells of Lakeland.